Kipling & Clark | Iceland
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Iceland

About This Project

HOME OF THE FIRST VIKING EXPLORERS

ICELANDIC CULTURE IS FOUNDED UPON THE NATION’S SCANDINAVIAN HERITAGE.

 

VIEW SAMPLE ITINERARIES

 

 

Iceland is known as the Land of Fire and Ice due to its many volcanoes as well as glaciers that cover nearly 10% of the country. The compelling and aesthetically pleasing scenery including mountains, canyons, waterfalls, green farmland, long blue fjords, deserts and hot springs are most compelling and a naturalists paradise! Iceland’s breathtaking nature paired with a unique cultural experience for visitors has made this historic land a tourist hub.

Please note Financial Times update based on article released March, 5th 2017

Iceland’s recent tourist boom may be fueling the city’s steep price gains. The increasing tourist industry has helped the country bury the memory of the financial crisis, when defaulting banks brought the country to the brink of economic meltdown. A report by Islandshanki (an Icelandic bank) in February 2016 forecast that, by the end of the year, Iceland’s tourists would outnumber residents by five to one. Yet the boom in tourism has not been matched by an expansion in hotel accommodation. The same report estimated that 1,397 new beds would be needed in 2016 to accommodate demand. Only 298 hotels were due to open last year.

REYKJAVIK

The capital and largest city of Iceland. Its latitude, at 64°08′ N, makes it the world’s northernmost capital of a sovereign state. It is located in southwestern Iceland, on the southern shore of the Faxaflói Bay. With a population of around 120,000 (and over 200,000 in the Capital Region), it is the heart of Iceland’s cultural, economic and governmental activity.

 

SNÆFELLSNES

It has been named Iceland in Miniature, because many national sights can be found in the area, including the Snæfellsjökull Volcano, regarded as one of the symbols of Iceland. With its height of 1446 m, it is the highest mountain on the peninsula and has a glacier at its peak (jökull means “glacier” in Icelandic). The volcano can be seen on clear days from Reykjavík, a distance of about 120 km. The mountain is also known as the setting of the novel Journey to the Center of the Earth by the French author Jules Verne.

 

GRINDAVIK

A fishing town at the Southern Peninsula at the southwest coast of Iceland. Home to the Blue Lagoon, a geothermal spa on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland. The warm waters are rich in minerals like silica and sulfur and bathing in the Blue Lagoon is reputed to help some people suffering from skin diseases such as psoriasis. The water temperature in the bathing and swimming area of the lagoon averages 37–39 °C (99–102 °F). The Blue Lagoon also operates a research and development facility to help find cures for other skin ailments using the mineral-rich water.

TIME ZONE

UTC±00:00

POPULATION

323,002 (2013)

LARGEST CITIES

Reykjavík, Snæfellsnes, Grindavík, and South Iceland.

Date

20 November

Category
Destinations